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Hubbard Life Blog

Your resource for advice from Hubbard® Life experts.


Sheep: The subject of nursery rhymes

There may not be any animal that appears in more nursery rhymes than the friendly sheep.

Why is that? They are docile, naturally follow each other around and just seem like you could cuddle up to them to read a good book. Perfect animal subjects to include in children’s nursery rhymes right?

I can think of three common nursery rhymes without even doing a google search.

  1. Mary had a little lamb...its fleece was white as snow
  2. Baa Baa black sheep have you any wool?
  3. Little Boy Blue come blow your horn the sheep are in the meadow…

These nursery rhymes portray two of the most noted characteristics of sheep - they produce a marketable commodity in wool/fleece and they exist very well on pasture.

I have noticed in the past 2-3 years that there is a real resurgence of people producing sheep. This is most likely due to the fact that profitability tended to be good in that time period. Are you one of these sheep producers? Or have you been thinking about becoming one?

My farm background included farrowing and raising pigs, a beef cow herd and chickens for egg laying. I did not have any practical experience with sheep production growing up. My early memories are from trips to my Grandpa & Grandma’s farm where they raised Suffolk sheep. I always marveled at how the little lambs that were dark grey (almost black) in color when they were small would soon grow to have totally white wool.

And nothing was more mesmerizing for me than to watch my Grandpa sheer the sheep. To see all of that fluffy wool just coming off in bunches. The sheering left the sheep looking so slim and trim when the wool was removed.

My experience in handling sheep amounted to holding the bottle to feed some of the small lambs that did not get enough because they were twins or triplets. And then later when I was in 4-H, I was asked to help some of my cousins in the show ring as they showed their 4-H lambs.

I guess the reason I got to thinking of all of these things "sheep" related is because Hubbard Feeds has just introduced an entire array of sheep feeds in our Hubbard® Life product line. We have several products to offer which should fit all situations for sheep and their shepherds:

  • 20% Starter
  • 17% Grower
  • 14% Finisher
  • A Conditioner for breeding stock maintenance
  • 37% Supplement for on-farm grain mixes
  • Sheep mineral

If you’ve used sheep feed from Hubbard in the past you’ve purchased our Tradition brand of feeds. Going forward you will have the opportunity to switch to Hubbard Life Sheep Feeds.

These feeds are a slight reformulation to our previous line to allow for an adjusted calcium/phosphorus ratio and higher levels of chelated zinc, organic selenium and Vitamin E.

Of course, one of the most talked about subjects when it comes to sheep feed is copper. It is well known and proven that sheep are susceptible to copper toxicity. Rest assured, none of the Hubbard Life products include any added copper.

Have questions?  Feel free to contact Hubbard Feeds or respond to this blog to hear back from a Hubbard Life nutritionist.  Or use our dealer locator to find a Hubbard Life dealer near you. 

To wrap it up, how about a new twist on one of the nursery rhymes. Baa baa black sheep have you any wool? Yes sir, yes sir (four) bags full. I just thought it may be possible that feeding Hubbard Life will give you a little extra in the wool bag.

 

Additional information at RaisingSheep.net

This website is a free resource for the new or aspiring shepherd...providing original, informative articles, a directory of sheep breeds, equipment reviews and useful advice.

Posted on 10/23/2012 by Amy Brown  |  Category: Sheep
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What's in a Name? It can be confusing when it comes to animals...here's a cheat sheet to help!

When I am talking to people about animals, I have noticed that sometimes they do not know what the normally recognized name is, for example, a male goat vs. a castrated male goat would be.  I thought today we would put together a list some of the more common names for several species.

 

Species

Female

Male

Castrated Male

Baby

Cattle

cow

bull

steer

calf

Sheep

ewe

ram

wether

lamb

Goat

doe

buck

wether

kid

Horse

mare

stallion

gelding

foal

Pigs

sow

boar

barrow

piglets

Chicken

hen

rooster

capon

chick

Duck/goose

hen

drake/gander

capon

duckling, gosling

Llama

female

male

wether

cria

Dogs

bitch

intact male

neutered

puppy

Cat

queen

tom

gib/castrated

kitten

 

I am sure there are lots of other names out there for each of these but these are the names I have heard the most.  Do you have any others to add?    

 

Posted on 10/12/2012 by Dr. Ed Bonnette  |  Category: Cat, Dog, Equine, Goat, Poultry, Sheep, Specialty
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